Download Lagu Lesti - Egois | Official Video Clip | Watch Movie | Folk, Country

Note: ebook file has been transmitted via an external affiliate, we can therefore furnish no guarantee for the existence of this file on our servers.

Seems you have not registered as a member of gpivn.com!. You may have to register before you can download all our books and magazines, click the button below to create a free account.

A History of the University of South Carolina, 1940-2000
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 471

A History of the University of South Carolina, 1940-2000

The history of the modern University of South Carolina (originally chartered as South Carolina College in 1801) describes the significant changes in the state and in the character of higher education in South Carolina. World War II, the civil rights struggle, and the revolution in research and South Carolina's economy transformed USC from a small state university in 1939, with a student body of less than 2,000 and an annual budget of $725,000, to a 1990 population of more than 25,000 and an annual budget of $454 million. then the University was little more than a small liberal arts college; today the university is at the head of a statewide system of higher education with eight branch campuses. Henry H. Lesesne recounts the historic transformation of USC into a modern research university, grounding that change in the context of the modernization of South Carolina and the South in general. The half century from 1940 to 1990 wrought great changes in South Carolina and its most prominent university. State and national politics, the challenges of funding modern higher educations, and the explosive growth of intercollegiate sports are among other elements of the University that were tra

South Carolina
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 716

South Carolina

The authoritative source for the Palmetto State's dramatic history.

Understanding August Wilson
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 165

Understanding August Wilson

Understanding August Wilson provides readers with a comprehensive view of the thematic structure of Wilson's plays, the placement of his plays within the context of American drama, and the distinctively African American experiences and traditions that Wilson dramatizes. In this critical study Mary L. Bogumil argues that Wilson gives voice to disfranchised and marginalized African Americans who have been promised a place and a stake in the American dream but find access to the rights and freedoms promised to all Americans difficult. The author maintains that Wilson not only portrays African Americans and the predicaments of American life but also sheds light on the atavistic connection African Americans have to their African ancestors. Bogumil explains that the playwright both perpetuates and subverts the tradition of American drama in order to expose the distinct differences between the white American and the African American experiences.

Reflections of South Carolina
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 208

Reflections of South Carolina

Truly a book that will captivate newcomers and renew the appreciation of longtime residents, this breathtaking photographic exploration showcases the fullness of the state's regional diversity, natural beauty, and human creativity. Two hundred color photographs record South Carolina's people and places, architecture and terrain, flora and fauna, past and progress. With a remarkable ability to capture the splendor and spirit of the land and its inhabitants, Robert C. Clark's photographs and Tom Poland's text craft a work of artistry and magnificence. A foreword by South Carolina historian Walter Edgar complements the photographs. From the forests and white-water rivers of the mountains to the...

South Carolina at the Brink
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 360

South Carolina at the Brink

As the Democratic governor of South Carolina during the height of the civil rights movement, Robert E. McNair faced the task of leading the state through the dismantling of its pervasive Jim Crow culture. Despite the obstacles, McNair was able to navigate a moderate course away from a past dominated by an old-guard oligarchy toward a more pragmatic, inclusive, and prosperous era. South Carolina at the Brink is the first biography of this remarkable statesman, as well as a history of the tumultuous times in which he governed. In telling McNair's story, Philip G. Grose recounts historic moments of epic turbulence, chronicles the development of the man himself, and maps the course of action tha...

At Home in the Heart of the Horseshoe
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 200

At Home in the Heart of the Horseshoe

The University of South Carolina was founded in 1801 on a modest parcel of land now called the Horseshoe. While the campus has grown well beyond its original borders, the oak-lined and gated historic Horseshoe remains the heart of campus life. At Home in the Heart of the Horseshoe pays tribute to the handsome regency-style structure at the midpoint of the historic Horseshoe. Constructed in 1854 to house faculty families, then used for sororities, the residence ultimately became the official President’s House in 1952. Through the stories and images in this beautiful book, Patricia Moore-Pastides provides a window into life at the University of South Carolina President’s House from her per...

The Mobile River
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 368

The Mobile River

The Mobile River presents the first-ever narrative history of this important American watercourse. Inspired by the venerable Rivers of America series, John S. Sledge weaves chronological and thematic elements with personal experiences and more than sixty color and black-and-white images for a rich and rewarding read. The Mobile River appears on the map full and wide at Nannahubba, fifty miles from the coast, where the Alabama and the Tombigbee rivers meet, but because it empties their waters into Mobile Bay and subsequently the Gulf of Mexico, it usurps them and their multitudinous tributaries. If all of the rivers, creeks, streams, bayous, bogues, branches, swamps, sloughs, rivulets, and tr...

The South Carolina Encyclopedia Guide to the American Revolution in South Carolina
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 134

The South Carolina Encyclopedia Guide to the American Revolution in South Carolina

The South Carolina Encyclopedia Guide to the American Revolution in South Carolina details the people, places, and struggles that defined the region's prominent role in the path to American liberty from British authority. Nearly 140 battles of the American Revolution were fought in South Carolina, more than in any other colony. As America's first civil war, the revolution pitted Loyalists against partisans and patriots in the fierce combat that established the legacies of figures such as Francis Marion, Nathanael Greene, Peter Horry, Henry and John Laurens, Daniel Morgan, and Andrew Jackson. In addition to profiling these leaders, this guide also chronicles the major combat operations, inclu...

Freshwater Fishes of South Carolina
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 430

Freshwater Fishes of South Carolina

"Freshwater Fishes of South Carolina is the result of long-term collaboration between a quartet of leading experts on the state's freshwater fishes - Fred C. Rohde, Rudolf G. Arndt, Jeffrey W. Foltz, and Joseph M. Quattro. From mudminnows and sunfishes to lampreys and sturgeons, the guide describes more than one hundred fifty species of freshwater and coastal estuarine fishes that spend all or major portions of their lives in the fresh waters of South Carolina. For each species the authors provide diagnostic characteristics including size, markings, similar species, and sexual dimorphism as well as information on biology, habitat, and distribution. Color photographs and detailed distribution maps accompany each description.

South Carolina's Turkish People
  • Language: en
  • Pages: 256

South Carolina's Turkish People

Despite its reputation as a melting pot of ethnicities and races, the United States has a well-documented history of immigrants who have struggled through isolation, segregation, discrimination, oppression, and assimilation. South Carolina is home to one such group—known historically and derisively as “the Turks”—which can trace its oral history back to Joseph Benenhaley, an Ottoman refugee from Old World conflict. According to its traditional narrative, Benenhaley served with Gen. Thomas Sumter in the Revolutionary War. His dark-hued descendants lived insular lives in rural Sumter County for the next two centuries, and only in recent decades have they enjoyed the full blessings of t...